Correctly Identifying Migraine Triggers - Formal Experiments Needed, So Work With Your Doctor

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Correctly Identifying Migraine Triggers - Formal Experiments Needed, So Work With Your Doctor

Post by Laura on Sun May 19, 2013 3:08 pm

I think I agree with this. The only thing I know for sure that consistently triggers it for me Is a disruption to my sleep routine.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/258814.php?sv=d
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Re: Correctly Identifying Migraine Triggers - Formal Experiments Needed, So Work With Your Doctor

Post by pīwakawaka on Sun May 19, 2013 7:48 pm

I'm beginning to wonder whether so called triggers really are that. The more research I do into what my possible triggers are, the less certain I am that I can positively identify them. It seems to me that I become sensitive to many stimuli shortly before a migraine whereas at other times the same stimuli have no effect. I'm coming to the conclusion that sensory overload and migraine are tightly interconnected - at least in my case. I'm not sure whether the migraine causes the sensory overload, or the overload causes the migraine.


I'm quite surprised how similar my experience during some migraines is to to the the simulation in the following link:
Autism: Sensory Overload Simulation

The simulation represents what someone with autism experiences during sensory overload. The major difference to what I experience is that once I have gone into overload, I remain that way for some time (hours to days) after the overload has been removed.


Perhaps for many (most?) migraineurs, migraines are the result of specific triggers. But I suspect that for some what at first appear to be migraine triggers only become triggers in the very earliest phases of a migraine before it otherwise becomes apparent. In other words we only become sensitive to triggers at certain times. Perhaps instead than trying to identify specific migraine triggers, some resources could be made available to find out why we become over sensitive to external stimuli at times and not sensitive to the same stimuli at other times. Just my 2 cents worth Smile

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